23 Jul 2018

Designing a Cart Path to Be Used Rather Than Ignored

If your golf course doesn’t already have cart paths, it is time to make a change since you are well behind the times. Cart paths can dramatically reduce the maintenance required for your course and can make it so golfers get where they need to go quickly. However, one of the major issues with new cart path additions is getting people to use them. You need to design a cart path so that it breaks those that use your course out of that straight line mentality which means instead of following your new or existing cart paths, they just drive straight over the grass. However, by utilizing these tips, you can create cart paths that are more likely to be used.

Designing a Cart Path to Be Used Rather Than Ignored

  • Circulation Over Concealment – While you may want cart paths to not affect the natural aesthetic, it should be a priority that people use them so they don’t ruin that natural aesthetic by running it over. The best case would be paths that provide good circulation and are concealed, but if one must be chosen, choose circulation.
  • Be as Direct as Possible – Many people will always take the most direct path, if the cart path goes out of the way to avoid something, this just invites people to take shortcuts instead of driving the path. Cutting across fairways is not preferable, but it can be necessary. So long as major landing areas are avoided, it may be best to take the most direct path so that people will actually drive it.
  • Choose Broad Curves – Once a cart is on the path, they are more likely to stay on the path unless something sudden happens, like a sharp curve taking them well away from the objective. However, if the curves are gentle, it not only keeps them on the path, but it actually will keep the path from wearing as quickly.
  • Limit Obstructions – It may be tempting to hide a cart path with earth such as passing it through valleys or with trees or shrubs, but this only creates funnels which can create traffic. Keep any obstructions far from the path, at least 15 feet, to prevent funneling.

For more information on cart path construction or golf course design and renovation, contact us today.

10 Jul 2018

How a Golf Course Shaping Can Make Renovation a Reality

Almost every golf course owner has that one area of their course, big or small, that they just don’t like. Maybe it is a little boring or doesn’t suit the course overall. However, renovation can be expensive and a major headache. You may hire architects to redesign it, but looking at the design on blueprint isn’t always as persuasive as it could be. It could leave you having a lot of second thoughts about your renovation, but there’s hope with golf course shaping.

How a Golf Course Shaping Can Make Renovation a Reality

If you have made the decision to renovate an area of your golf course or even the entire thing, a shaper’s job is to bring the architect’s blueprints to life with a bulldozer. Essentially they mold the earth like it is clay and bring the vision to life in front of your eyes. Often, golf course owners find that once they have seen a shaper’s work, they view the renovation much more positively because they can actually see the vision of the architect too.

While a shaper’s work seems very permanent, it isn’t quite so. In fact, if you see a shaper’s work following the blueprints and you don’t like it, it remains completely able to be changed. After all, it’s just dirt, you simply need to add more or reduce the amount to really change the shape. Once the landscapers have put sod down, it can be a little more difficult, but if you have issues during the shaping phase, your new course renovation is still very easy to change. It is a process very much like molding clay. It can take many shapes until hardened, or in this case, covered in grass.

If you want to learn more about the golf course renovation process, or want to take advantage of our shaping services to change a portion of your course, contact us today.